Kenora Great War Project

 

Personal Details
Date of BirthJuly 19, 1889
Place of BirthMaybole, Crosshill, Ayrshire
CountryScotland
Marital StatusMarried
Next of KinRosanna: Wife, Dalhowan Strret, Crosshill, Ayshire
Trade / CallingBaker
ReligionPresbyterian
Service Details
Regimental Number439546
Service Record Link to Service Record
Battalion52nd Battalion
ForceCanadian Expeditionary Force
BranchCanadian Infantry
Enlisted / ConscriptedEnlisted
Place of EnlistmentKenora, Ontario
Address at EnlistmentKeewatin, Ontario
Date of EnlistmentAugust 5, 1915
Age at Enlistment26
Theatre of ServiceEurope
Prisoner of WarNo
Survived WarYes
Death Details
Date of DeathApril 7, 1945
Age at Death55

Harvey, Robert

Robert Harvey was born in Maybole, Crosshill, Ayrshire Scotland on July 19, 1889. His father was a tailor, but Robert became a baker.

He married Rosanna Hunter on Feb. 2, 1910 and they had one daughter, Elizabeth, born that year.

In 1910 Robert immigrated to Canada, coming to Keewatin, Ontario. His wife and daughter followed the following year.  His brother Samuel joined them in 1913.

In early August of 1915 both Robert and Samuel(441632) enlisted in the CEF, Robert in Kenora on Aug. 5, where he joined the 52nd Battalion, and Samuel at Camp Sewell in Manitoba on Aug. 4 where he was assigned to the 53rd (North Saskatchewan) Battalion. Samuel, who was single, had tried to enlist the previous December in Kenora, but was rejected due to poor teeth.  Samuel would later be killed at Passchendaele on Nov. 6, 1917.

Robert trained with the 52nd Battalion in Kenora and Port Arthur, shipping overseas with the battalion in November of 1915 and arrived in France Feb. 21, 1916. Frontline service was hard on Robert Harvey. He was hospitalized for influenza for a week in July of 1916, and treated for shell shock from Sept. 21 to Oct 25, 1916 in hospital and rear rest areas.

He returned to hospital again in December suffering from Neurasthenia (fragile nerves) and again in Feb. 1917 for hammer toes (deformed toes), likely due to poorly fitting boots. Due to his poor health – his medical reports describe him as generally healthy, but tired and suffering from broken sleep – he was transferred from frontline service with the 52 Battalion to the 9th Brigade Headquarters support troops where he served for the balance of the war.

Demobilized on May 28, 1919, he was returned to Canada with other returning troops, but later moved back to Scotland. He is commemorated for his service on the Municipality of Keewatin For King and Country plaque and on the Lake of the Woods Milling Company Roll of Honour.

He died April 7, 1945 in Greenock, Scotland and was survived by his second wife, Christina.

by Bob Stewart


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